Chapter 14

-In order to not waste space and readers time, writers should stick to completeness, conciseness, correctness, courtesy, and responsibility.

-The 3 main purposes of e-mail are:

1) reduce cost of employee communications

2) increase the distribution of messages to more employees

3) flatten the corporate hierarchy

4) speed up decision-making

The following are some suggestions about the content of an e-mail:

Keep messages brief

Sparingly use attachments because they are distracting

Always double-check who will receive the message

Always reread the message before sending

Respond to work e-mails in a timely manner

-A memorandum (or memo) is a short (a page or less) written message that asks information, supplies information, confirm verbal exchange, ask for/schedule/cancel a meeting, remind, report, praise, caution, state a policy, or any other function that needs a message.

I obtained my information from Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques: 6th Edition by Dennis L. Wilcox

Link to book:

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291176363&sr=8-1

Advertisements

Add a comment December 1, 2010

PR Connection #12

Twitter has completely taken off on the social media map in the past two years. While I do feel that your Twitter page is your’s and what you choose to put on there is your choice, I did enjoy these guidelines found in a blog on 101PublicRelations.com. Some of the guidelines I liked best were don’t pitch your business right out of the box, keep private conversations private, and wisdom is good especially if it is yours. I love wisdom quotes and quotes that are inspiring and uplifting.

The following are the list of ‘dont’s’ that the site provided:

  • In last week’s article we stressed the importance of NOT filling your Twitter feed with totally personal items that nobody cares about. Don’t greet the world when you get up, tell them what you had for breakfast, or when you’re going to bed. Unless you’re a celebrity, who people actually get paid for taking pictures of you doing those things, twittering on those subjects will just push people away.
  • Don’t do inside jokes that only a few people will understand.
  • Don’t complain about the world. Nobody likes whiners in real life, and they certainly aren’t going to continually follow you if you do it online.
  • Don’t use it as a place for spouting off on whatever subject is on your mind at the moment. Think, then write.
  • Unless your audience is following you because of your religious or political views, you generally should stay away from those subjects. Sorry, I know. You’ll never believe how hard it was for me to not hit the enter key after writing some amazing posts during the recent US election…
  • This is the link to the full article:

    http://101publicrelations.com/blog/twitterable_what_to_twitter_about_001842.html#more

    Add a comment December 1, 2010

    PR Connection #11

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    On PublicRelationsBlogger.com I found and article entitled “5 Tips for Creating Successful Marketing/Business & Public Relations Plans”. I enjoyed this article because it gives tips on how to create a plan that is not only best for you and your company/organization, but also ways that these tips can make any marketing or PR plan successful.

    1. Be Smart. Though all three plans will have a different “formal” structure to them, they should all encompass similar items, and be created in a similar fashion: an educated, researched, and thoughtful one. When you create your plan, do so with care. This is for you, and your success, so don’t see it as a chore. Much like driving to an unknown location, a map (your plan) can be helpful in finding and directing you to your desired destination, whatever it may be. This process will, of course, also help you to establish if your desired destination is completely unattainable and far-fetched, but don’t be afraid to be ambitious.
    2. Be S.M.A.R.T. You may have read this online elsewhere, and even earlier on this blog, but it’s worth repeating. When it comes time to create your objectives and strategies, really employ this point of view. (Avoiding this step will make the plan useless in and of itself, so if you don’t plan on really taking the time to develop and create you strategies and tactics, I would highly recommend you hire a professional.) This acronym stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time Bound. This follows from #1, in that you can create goals that are semi-lofty and hard to reach, but still within reach if you can find the right items to leverage yourself. Be aware of your limitations, and those of the universe, when creating your plans. Also be respectful of others that you plan depends on.
    3. Be Comprehensive. Take a look at all areas of the plan that need to be created. When you create a plan for the first time, you need to go through the motions to ensure your plan is built for success. For example, if you create your budget first, you may find most of what you want to do in your plan far surpassing what you’d estimated. Similarly, if you create tactics without first creating strategies, you’re drawing your own directions on your map that may or may not lead to your destination. (It’s like following traffic, not knowing why, and hoping they’re going where you need to go; try to avoid that.)
    4. Get Feedback. If you need assistance in getting these created, then get some! There is a plethora of advice online, and even more available persons to come to your rescue! Find someone who knows PR and marketing; the two are very similar online, and when creating a marketing/business plan and PR plan, their advice can come in handy.
    5. Maintain and Manage. There’s nothing more detrimental to your success than leaving your PR/Marketing plans to fend for themselves. Coming back around to the car analogy, this is like beginning your journey and never filling the tank or checking the map to ensure you are still headed in the right direction. If you’ve gone through the trouble of creating your plan, take the time to monitor what’s happening with the tactics/activities you’ve created. This can be most helpful when it comes time to create a new plan or revamp your existing one. Much like a vehicle, these plans do need to be replaced or repaired. Also similar to choosing a vehicle based on your needs, your PR plan can change dramatically based upon your goals and needs presently.

    Link to full article:

    http://publicrelationsblogger.com/2010/10/5-tips-for-creating-successful.html

    Add a comment November 30, 2010

    Blog Comment #20

    Casey Corley’s Blog-PRCA 3330 by Casey Corley

    November 30, 2010

    http://caseycorley.wordpress.com/2010/11/30/helpful-tips-for-bloggers/#comment-126

    First of all I would like to just comment on how cute your layout is Miss. Corley :) And I loved these guidelines…especially the last one because blogging should be a fun way to express your feelings and share thoughts or information! I AM often intimidated by my blog because I feel like it’s not going to be good enough or meaningful. I am also scared to voice my opinion too much because I don’t want to offend anyone, but then I think to myself, “well it is MY blog…” I am also guilty of not getting to know fellow bloggers other than a few people in our class and maybe a few friends with blogs. Thanks for posting dear :)

    Add a comment November 30, 2010

    Blog Comment #19

    Alicia’s Blog by Alicia Addison

    November 30, 2010

    http://addi88.wordpress.com/2010/10/26/pr-connections-using-social-media-to-jumpstart-your-career/#comment-61

    I also had never heard of the Alltop website until this post. This article offers very useful information in keeping certain information off the internet that you would not want advertised to the world. I always try to use the mindset that anyone could see what I am posting or doing and that helps me filter through things that may or may not be appropriate for social media sites such as Facebook or Twitter. Like Casey, my favorite point mentioned was “present yourself the was you want to be perceived”. That is very short, self-explanatory, and to the point. The other tip I liked was “learn by watching others”. I can honestly relate to this because when I see things that people post that are just too inappropriate I think to myself that I don’t want to be portrayed the way that person is portraying themselves.

    Add a comment November 30, 2010

    Chapter 12

    – Websites’ homepages are typically boring and not worth looking at. However the following are ways to avoid boring home pages:

    1) Define the site objective

    2) Design the site  that caters to your audience

    3) Redesign the material so that it does not get redundant and repetitive

    4) Update the site and site content

    5) Because complex graphics take a while to load, don’t go overboard with graphics.

    -Tips from Shel Holtz, author of Public Relations on the Net, suggested the following writing tips for online print:

    Write in a conversational tone

    Limit each page to a single concept

    Limit your use of italics and boldface because they attract attention.

    Provide the option for readers to give feedback so your site can be improved based on what the audience wants.

    -Ways to attraction visitors to your website are using hyperlinks that link your website to organizations related to your site, get your site on search engine databases, and advertising.

    – Using Return on Investment (ROI) is a good way to convince management that a website is worth the money spent on them.

    -Types of blogs include corporate blogs, employee blogs, and third-party blogs.

    I obtained my information from Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques: 6th Edition by Dennis L. Wilcox

    Link to book:

    http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291176363&sr=8-1

     

    Add a comment November 29, 2010

    Chapter 11

    -PR professionals and the media often have a rocky relationship. Areas of friction are based on mutual cooperation, trust, and respect. Specific areas of friction are:

    1) Hype and news release spam

    2) Name calling

    3) Sloppy or biased reporting

    4) Tabloid journalism

    5) Advertising influence

    -Working with journalists through interviews, tours, events, and conferences can cause disagreements on both parties. If one is interviewed by a journalist, it is best to interview them first by asking some of the following questions:

    Who are you?

    What is the story about?

    Why did you call me?

    What are you looking for from me?

    Who else are you speaking with?

    Are you going to use my comments in your story?

    When is the story going to run?

    -The following are some tips on how to handle interviews with print/broadcast personnel:

    1) Determine ahead of time what key point or message you want to get across representing the organization or client

    2) Like answers to questions to your key message

    3) Instead of exaggerating or telling only half the truth use examples and anecdots.

    4) Say your comments within 30 seconds or less in order to be quotable.

    5) Saying “no comment” gives off the vibe that you are hiding something, so instead give a reason why you can’t comment or offer alternative information.

    – News conferences occur when many reporters ask questions and is usually called by an organization when something significant is occurring that needs announcement.

    – A media tour involves personal visits to multiple cities and media throughout a region or the nation.

    – A press preview or party is called when a new facility is opening, a new product is launched, or when a new promotion for an existing product is announced.

    I obtained my information from Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques: 6th Edition by Dennis L. Wilcox

    Link to book:

    http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291176363&sr=8-1

     

    Add a comment November 29, 2010

    Blog Comment #18

    Journalistics: Now Rank This: Blog Posts That Drive Traffic by Jeremy Porter

    November 28, 2010

    http://blog.journalistics.com/2010/now-rank-this-blog-posts-that-drive-traffic/comment-page-1/#comment-6199

    I enjoy lists on blogs because, as you said, I have a short attention span. Lists DO catch my attention and keep my attention. While using lists or rankings for every post would get very redundant, one every now and then gives a blog some “flair”, if you will. I agree that it is important to see what works best not only for you, but what your readers enjoy best (if you are trying to cater to them). Checking/Including the facts is always a great way to basically add a backbone to your post. The facts add credibility and make a story much more convincing.

    Add a comment November 28, 2010

    Blog Comment #17

    ‘Still Traveling’- Waterfront Christmas Traditions by Keith Still

    November 28, 2010

    http://blogs.ajc.com/still-traveling-blog/2010/11/24/waterfront-christmas-traditions/?cp=1#comment-14415

    There is nothing better than Christmas in the South. The Parade of Boats is definitely a treat if you have never been to it so I can appreciate you including it in this “list”. Most people also would not think of Key West at Christmas time because, well, most people associate Christmas with cold weather and snow (not warm weather and the beach). I have always heard of the holiday celebration(s) Key West offers in terms of lights and events, but have never actually been myself.

    Add a comment November 28, 2010

    PR Connection #10

    A website that I recently stumbled upon (no pun intended) is Stumbled Upon. Stumbled Upon is a website that literally almost contains everything. When you create an account on Stumbled Upon, they will ask you things you are interested in. Now mind you I am no professional at all of the following topics but I listed some of them because I AM interested in them and I would love to learn more about them. Some topics I chose were photography, art, advertisements, cooking, board games, shopping, eating, fashion, Christmas, beer, cheerleading, football, celebrity news, and about 30 others (no exaggeration). Now mind you I am a “newbie” to this website but I am already in love! I can find blogs about particular subjects, find fellow “stumblers” that share the same interests as I, rate websites, add websites, manage my personal profile, play games…I literally could go on and on because this site has something for (dare I say….) everyone!

    How it works (I think)- When you register you choose topics that interest you. When you start “stumbling” through the website, other websites/pages will come up. If you like the website you can give it a thumbs up and potentially see posts from that site again. If you don’t like it, simply give it a thumbs down and most likely you will not see it again! It’s that easy! A website that caters to ME and what I want to see and surf! From advertisements, to blogs I can see all sorts of pages that contain information that just makes me happy 🙂

    If you have not seen this site yet don’t be the last to hear about it and tell your friends. It is surely entertaining and a nice alternative when you have seen all the latest “news” on Facebook!

    1 comment November 19, 2010

    Pages

    Categories

    Links

    Meta

    Calendar

    December 2017
    M T W T F S S
    « Dec    
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    25262728293031

    Most Recent Posts