Posts filed under: ‘PRCA 3330 Reading Notes‘




Chapter 14

-In order to not waste space and readers time, writers should stick to completeness, conciseness, correctness, courtesy, and responsibility.

-The 3 main purposes of e-mail are:

1) reduce cost of employee communications

2) increase the distribution of messages to more employees

3) flatten the corporate hierarchy

4) speed up decision-making

The following are some suggestions about the content of an e-mail:

Keep messages brief

Sparingly use attachments because they are distracting

Always double-check who will receive the message

Always reread the message before sending

Respond to work e-mails in a timely manner

-A memorandum (or memo) is a short (a page or less) written message that asks information, supplies information, confirm verbal exchange, ask for/schedule/cancel a meeting, remind, report, praise, caution, state a policy, or any other function that needs a message.

I obtained my information from Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques: 6th Edition by Dennis L. Wilcox

Link to book:

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291176363&sr=8-1

Advertisements

Add a comment December 1, 2010

Chapter 12

– Websites’ homepages are typically boring and not worth looking at. However the following are ways to avoid boring home pages:

1) Define the site objective

2) Design the site  that caters to your audience

3) Redesign the material so that it does not get redundant and repetitive

4) Update the site and site content

5) Because complex graphics take a while to load, don’t go overboard with graphics.

-Tips from Shel Holtz, author of Public Relations on the Net, suggested the following writing tips for online print:

Write in a conversational tone

Limit each page to a single concept

Limit your use of italics and boldface because they attract attention.

Provide the option for readers to give feedback so your site can be improved based on what the audience wants.

-Ways to attraction visitors to your website are using hyperlinks that link your website to organizations related to your site, get your site on search engine databases, and advertising.

– Using Return on Investment (ROI) is a good way to convince management that a website is worth the money spent on them.

-Types of blogs include corporate blogs, employee blogs, and third-party blogs.

I obtained my information from Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques: 6th Edition by Dennis L. Wilcox

Link to book:

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291176363&sr=8-1

 

Add a comment November 29, 2010

Chapter 11

-PR professionals and the media often have a rocky relationship. Areas of friction are based on mutual cooperation, trust, and respect. Specific areas of friction are:

1) Hype and news release spam

2) Name calling

3) Sloppy or biased reporting

4) Tabloid journalism

5) Advertising influence

-Working with journalists through interviews, tours, events, and conferences can cause disagreements on both parties. If one is interviewed by a journalist, it is best to interview them first by asking some of the following questions:

Who are you?

What is the story about?

Why did you call me?

What are you looking for from me?

Who else are you speaking with?

Are you going to use my comments in your story?

When is the story going to run?

-The following are some tips on how to handle interviews with print/broadcast personnel:

1) Determine ahead of time what key point or message you want to get across representing the organization or client

2) Like answers to questions to your key message

3) Instead of exaggerating or telling only half the truth use examples and anecdots.

4) Say your comments within 30 seconds or less in order to be quotable.

5) Saying “no comment” gives off the vibe that you are hiding something, so instead give a reason why you can’t comment or offer alternative information.

– News conferences occur when many reporters ask questions and is usually called by an organization when something significant is occurring that needs announcement.

– A media tour involves personal visits to multiple cities and media throughout a region or the nation.

– A press preview or party is called when a new facility is opening, a new product is launched, or when a new promotion for an existing product is announced.

I obtained my information from Public Relations Writing and Media Techniques: 6th Edition by Dennis L. Wilcox

Link to book:

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291176363&sr=8-1

 

Add a comment November 29, 2010

Chapter 10

Although media databases vary in format and scope a common denominator is that they usually provide essential information such as names of publications/broadcast stations, mailing address, telephone/fax numbers, e-mail addresses, and names of key editors/reporters.

An editorial calendar is a listing of topics and special issues that a periodical will feature throughout the year.

Tip sheets are weekly newsletters that report on recent changes in news personnel and their new assignments, how to contact them, and what kinds of material they are looking for.

The primary distribution channels of materials are e-mail, online newsrooms, electronic newswires, mat distribution companies, and photo placement firms.

The 3 major newswires are Business Wire (www.businesswire.com), PR Newswire (www.prnewswire.com) and Marketwire (www.marketwire.com).

The most popular and efficient way of delivering camera-ready materials is to post them on the website of a feature placement firm.

 

I got my information on Chapter 6 from: Public Relations Writing and Media Ethics

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285719961&sr=8-1

 

Add a comment November 2, 2010

Chapter 9

Radio reaches about 94% of adults over the age of 18 on a daily basis (with a total audience of about 22.5 million).

Audio news releases (ANR) can take 2 forms:

1) someone with a good radio voice can read the entire announcement (they may or may not be identified by name)

2) Use another announcer but also incorporate a soundbite from a satisfied customer, celebrity, or company spokesperson.

The following are some “rules” for successful radio and television story placement:

Topicality, timeliness, localization, humanization, and visual appeal.

Public Service Announcements (or PSAs) are defined by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) as unpaid announcements that promote programs of government or nonprofit agencies or that serve the public interest.

The most common positions at both radio and television stations are general manager, program director, directors/producers, news director, assignment editor, reporters, public affairs/public service director, and promotion director.

 

I got my information on Chapter 6 from: Public Relations Writing and Media Ethics

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285719961&sr=8-1

 

Add a comment November 2, 2010

Chapter 8

Pictures are worth a thousand words. The components that pictures should have in print are technical quality, subject matter, composition, action, scale, camera angle, lighting and timing, and color.

The best way to find a photographer that best suits your needs and budgets is to make folders/files based on experience or recommendations of photographers.

A caption is the brief text under a photo that tells the reader about the picture and its source.

Pictures or photos are not the only way to add art to publicity. Charts, diagrams, renderings/scale models, and line drawings/clip art can also be used.

When e-mailing photos there are four different format options:

1) thumbnail

2) a slightly bigger preview image

3) a low-resolution version

4) a high resolution version

 

I got my information on Chapter 6 from: Public Relations Writing and Media Ethics

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285719961&sr=8-1

 

Add a comment November 2, 2010

Chapter 7

Feature stories can provide additional background information, generate human interest, and create understanding in a more imaginative way.

A proposal/outline for a magazine is often required by some magazine editors. The following are points that should be included in a proposal:

-Tentative title of the article

-Subject and theme

-Significance. Why is the topic important? Why should readers know about it?

-Major points.

-Description of photos and graphics available.

Types of features are case studies, application stories, research study, backgrounder, personality profile, and historical pieces.

The major parts of a feature piece is the headline, the lead, the body, the summary, and photos/graphics.

Some common placements for feature stories can be in newspapers, general magazines, specialty/trade magazines, or internal publications.

 

I got my information on Chapter 6 from: Public Relations Writing and Media Ethics

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285719961&sr=8-1

 

Add a comment October 12, 2010

Chapter 6

A fact sheet accompanies a news release and is typically a list of facts in an outline or bullet form that a reporter can use as a quick reference when writing a story.

Media advisories are also called media alerts. They tell assignment editors about upcoming events that they might be interested in covering for a story, photo, or video.

The typical media kit is 9 by 12 inches and has four sides (a cover, two inside pages, and a back cover that has the organization or company’s name, address, and website address). They often include a short, personalized letter to the editor that is considered a pitch for using the material.

Important steps to pitching a story:

1) Research the publication

2) Preparing the pitch

3) Follow up your pitch

Six elements to a pitch include:

1) enough facts to support a full story

2) an angle of interest to the readers of that specific publication

3) the possibility of alternative angles

4) an offer to supply or help secure all needed stats, quotes, interviews, arrangement for photos, and so on

5) an indication of authority or credibility

6) an offer to call the editor soon to get a decision

I got my information on Chapter 6 from: Public Relations Writing and Media Ethics

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285719961&sr=8-1

Add a comment September 29, 2010

Chapter 5

News releases help achieve organizational objectives and are cost effective.

Some formatting rules for a printed news release:

-Use 10-12 pt. standard font

-Don’t split sentences or paragraphs between pages

-Never hyphenate a word at the end of a line

-Number pages in a news release

-Place a slug line (short description) at the top of each page after the first one in order to identify the story in case the pages get separated.

-Write “more” at the end of each page if the news release continues

-Write one of the old journalistic terms such as “end” or “###” at the end of your release.

5 types of news releases- Announcements, Spot announcements, Reaction releases, Bad news, and Local news.

6 basic components of a news release:

1) letterhead

2) contacts

3) headline

4) dateline

5) lead paragraph

6) body of text

Types of leads for a news release- straight summary lead, informal lead, and feature lead.

The traditional e-mail news release is 400 words, but the new standard for e-mail release is fewer than 200 words.

I got my information on Chapter 5 from: Public Relations Writing and Media Ethics

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285719961&sr=8-1

Add a comment September 29, 2010

Chapter 4

A publicist is a public relations writer who writes and places stories in the media.

The following are traditional values that make news newsworthy:

-Timliness

-Prominence

-Proximity

-Significance

-Unusualness

-Human Interest

-Conflict

-Newness

Internal news sources include important papers, periodicals, clipping files, and other published materials.

My favorite part of chapter 4 was the list of how to develop your creative instincts. The following are some of the ways to spark creative insights:

-Look at things with new eyes

-Hear with new eyes

-Stop saying or thinking “No”

-Don’t limit your thinking

-Get excited about ideas that may change the way you do business

-Record ideas whenever they occur

A rally or protest generates news because one of the traditional news values is at conflict.

I got my information on Chapter 4 from: Public Relations Writing and Media Ethics

http://www.amazon.com/Public-Relations-Writing-Media-Techniques/dp/0205648282/ref=sr_1_1?s=gateway&ie=UTF8&qid=1285719961&sr=8-1

Add a comment September 29, 2010

Pages

Categories

Links

Meta

Calendar

September 2017
M T W T F S S
« Dec    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category